Hepatic Encephalopathy

Hepatic Encephalopathy

Code K76.82

hepatic encephalophy

We now have a code (K76.82) for Hepatic Encephalopathy for FY 2023.  This includes documentation such as: “Hepatocerebral intoxication” and “Portal-systemic encephalopathy.” 

It is important to note in the ICD-10-CM manual that we are to Code Also underlying liver diseases such as acute and subacute hepatic failure without coma (K72.00), alcoholic hepatic failure without coma (K70.40), chronic hepatic failure without coma (K72.10), hepatic failure with toxic liver disease without coma (K71.10), hepatic failure without coma (K72.90), icterus of newborn (P55-P59), postprocedural hepatic failure (K91.82), viral hepatitis without hepatic coma (B15.9, B16.1, B16.9, B17.10, B19.10, B19.20, B19.9). 

Patients with hepatic encephalopathy can lose consciousness and go into a hepatic coma.  Therefore, there is an Excludes1 Note that prohibits us from coding hepatic encephalopathy with codes that have ‘with coma’ in the description:  acute and subacute hepatic failure with coma (K72.01), alcoholic hepatic failure with coma (K70.41), chronic hepatic failure with coma (K72.11), hepatic failure with coma (K72.91). 

 

CDI Tips: Dementia

Dementia: Will we need more queries?

CDI Tip Dementia

The short answer is yes! We need documentation of none, other, or a specified type of mood disorder. 

But here is the long answer:

“Dementia The ICD-10-CM classifies dementia (categories F01, F02, and F03) on the basis of the etiology and severity (unspecified, mild, moderate, or severe). Selection of the appropriate severity level requires the provider’s clinical judgment, and codes should be assigned only on the basis of provider documentation (as defined in the Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting) unless otherwise instructed by the classification. If the documentation does not provide information about the severity of dementia, assign the appropriate code for unspecified severity. If a patient is admitted to an inpatient acute care hospital or other inpatient facility setting with dementia at one severity level and it progresses to a higher severity level, assign one code for the highest severity level reported during the stay.” (2023 ICD-10-CM official guidelines, page 43.)

To accurately assign dementia, it is necessary for the provider to document the severity of dementia as mild, moderate, or severe.

  • Mild is coded with the fourth character A
  • Moderate is coded with the fourth character B
  • Severe is coded with the fourth character C

For example, Vascular dementia, Moderate is coded to F01.B-. There is a code for unspecified severity F03.9, but as CDI specialists, if we are going to query for the type of behavioral disturbance, we could ask for severity as well. Unspecified severity can be coded if the provider really does not know. The severity of dementia does not determine if the code is a CC.

However, there is no code for unspecified mood disturbance, only for other and without. The dementia code without behavioral disturbance is not a CC. Specified disturbances such as psychotic disturbance, agitation, mood disturbance, or anxiety are CCs. The tabular section of the ICD-10-CM code book found at www.CMS.gov/Medicare/coding/ICD10 gives examples of what is included in these different behavioral disturbances.

Where do you find clinical indicators to support documentation of behavioral disturbances?

  • Previous encounters: Has the patient been seen previously with documentation of behavioral disturbances related to dementia? How were they described? Be sure to include the date and location of the information in your query!
  • Nursing documentation: Does nursing describe behaviors that could be included in your query to support the query regarding the specificity of behavioral disturbances?
  • Social services documentation: Is there documentation that indicates behavior has been a problem at home? Have family members indicated there are behavioral issues at home?
  • Consult notes: Has the patient been evaluated by psychiatry, neurology, or gerontology related to dementia?
  • Medications: Is the patient on medications that indicate there is a behavioral component of their dementia that is being treated?
  • Provider documentation: Does the doctor mention any signs and symptoms such as hallucinations, or “the patient is anxious”? Look for statements that could support a query for a specific behavioral disturbance.

Remember that complete and accurate documentation improves patient care across the continuum of care, and the clinical documentation specialist plays a key role in making this happen.

Get updated on the 2022 Query Compliance Brief and earn AHIMA CEUs

The newly released and much anticipated 2022 UPDATE of the AHIMA/ACDIS Guidelines for Achieving a Compliant Query Practice is here! We’re offering two live webinar opportunities for you to be informed, stay up-to-date, and earn 1.5 AHIMA-approved CEUs. Choose your date and register: Friday, November 11th, 10 AM EST  or Thursday,  November 17th, 2 PM EST.

E/M Hot Topic: 2023 Changes Overview

Significant E/M changes are coming in 2023! Jeanie Heck, our director of Education, will begin her E/M Hot Topic series this month with an overview of these changes. Subsequent monthly E/M Hot Topic presentations will provide a deeper dive into the individual categories affected by these new changes.

For additional information about E/M Guideline Updates education, contact us.

Follow us on LinkedIn to keep up-to-date.

Today’s Tip: Hypercholesterolemia and Hyperlipidemia

Hypercholesterolemia and HyperlipidemiaProviders often use the terms hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia interchangeably. Technically, hyperlipidemia is a high or elevated lipid/fat level in the blood. High blood cholesterol is a lipid disorder. As a result, when hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia are both documented in the record, only assign code E78.00 (Pure hypercholesterolemia) per Coding Clinic, Second Quarter 2022.  On the other hand, when ‘mixed hyperlipidemia’ and ‘hypercholesterolemia’ are both documented, assign code E78.2 (Mixed hyperlipidemia).  In this example, hypercholesterolemia is included in the E78.2 code.

Today’s Tip: Light Meconium-stained Fluid

Meconium fluidMeconium gives the amniotic fluid a greenish color. This is called meconium staining. Coding Clinic, Second Quarter 2022 clarifies ‘light meconium-stained fluid’ and how to code it.  The presence of any meconium staining may indicate fetal distress, therefore code O77.0 (Labor and delivery affected by meconium in amniotic fluid) is appropriate to code if documented as such.   There does not need to be documentation of fetal distress or maternal conditions to code.

2022 ICD-10-CM CODE O77.0

 

Today’s Tip: The Eliquis Coding Conundrum

Eliquis can be used as an anticoagulant or an antithrombotic. When a patient is on Eliquis long-term, it can be a coding conundrum. As published in Coding Clinic, Second Quarter 2022, ICD-10-CM classifies Eliquis as an anticoagulant medication.  Therefore, if long-term use of Eliquis is documented in the record, assign code Z79.01 (The long-term (current) use of anticoagulants).

Today’s Tip: Metabolic Bone Disease (MBD)

This condition is commonly documented along with chronic kidney disease (CKD). MBD is a broad term used to describe a group of bone disorders of bone strength usually caused by mineral abnormalities such as calcium, phosphorus, vitamin D, or magnesium. As published in Coding Clinic, Second Quarter 2022, when MBD is a component of another disease process, only the underlying condition (e.g., secondary hyperparathyroidism or renal osteodystrophy) is coded. If no underlying condition is documented, code the appropriate code from subcategory M89.8X-.

Today’s Tip: Cachexia (R64)

Cachexia (R64) is also known as ‘wasting’ or ‘wasting syndrome’. It is a general state of weakness involving marked weight and muscle loss. Emaciated is another term that may be found in the documentation that also maps to code R64.

These diagnoses are often missed since they are commonly only seen in the Physical Exam or Review of Systems portion of a record. There are often ‘knee-jerk’ reactions that can lead a coder to investigate further if a patient may have these diagnoses. 

What to look for

Cachexia is commonly seen in patients who have AIDS, cancer, or other advanced heart or lung disease. You will often see a lack of appetite, fatigue, low BMI, and malnutrition. Look for nutritional consults and a PEG tube in the documentation to trigger the search for cachexia in the documentation. 

Why is this so important? 

Cachexia is a diagnosis that can affect reimbursement for both Inpatient and Risk Adjustment. Don’t miss it!

 

E/M Hot Topic: 2022 Principal Care Management Services

Jeanie Heck, our Director of Education, wraps up our E/M Hot Topic series for 2021 discussing the new 2022 Principal Care Management Services codes. In 2022, we will have three general categories of Care Management in our E/M section. The new PCM codes allow providers, qualified health care practitioners, and clinical staff to report a code(s) for the management of a single chronic condition.

For additional information about E/M Guideline Updates education, contact us.

Follow us on LinkedIn to keep up-to-date.

E/M Hot Topic: Social Determinants of Health (SDOH2)

In our E/M Hot Topic discussions, we previously addressed the proper capture of Social Determinant of Health (SDOH) codes that can make a difference when determining the level of service for office visit codes. When used properly, they can impact the final MDM selection and subsequent reimbursement. In the November E/M Hot Topic, Jeanie Heck, our Director of Education, re-addresses this topic and reviews the new 2022 Chapter Specific Coding Guidelines for SDOH.

For additional information about E/M Guideline Updates education, contact us.

Follow us on LinkedIn to find out when the next E/M Hot Topic is released.

E/M Hot Topic: Telehealth

In September’s E/M Hot Topic, Jeanie Heck, our Director of Education at Intellis, discusses telehealth. The 2022 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule proposes that CMS allow some telehealth services to remain on the list until the end of 2023. This is intended to help determine if some of the services should be permanently added to the telehealth list following the COVID-19 PHE. During this presentation, Jeanie reviews some trustworthy and reliable sites to reference regarding telehealth.

For additional information about E/M Guideline Updates education, contact us.

Follow us on LinkedIn to find out when the next E/M Hot Topic is released.